Daring to Earn an Honest Wage

Dhoker Jhara Village, India

 

This month in Dhoka Jhara Village, the villagers were taught about income generation and education. A few villagers found it difficult to understand, while the rest liked it. A man named *Manvay wanted to earn 20,000 rupees (about $300) per month. Before this, Manvay was quite skilled as a barber, so I taught him a few more skills. After this, Manvay opened a salon business in a wooden house. Within the span of one-and-a-half months, he earned around 18,000 rupees (about $250).

                     

After seeing his work, the other barbers got jealous and burned his wooden house to the ground. Everything was destroyed. Then Manvay was afraid for his life and could not think of making any money. Then I encouraged him by telling him not to fear and to keep up the hope for starting his salon business again. One day, he could still earn 20,000 rupees (about $300) per month. He could do this by renting a house. Nobody could burn someone else’s house that was not Manvay’s. Manvay is going to restart his work in May, as we are both collecting money for his business.

 

Then, we encouraged the people of Johar Tola to sell things like sweet apples and washing detergent instead of wine to earn money. In May, we gave training on these. After this training, they started selling in the chora bazaar of this village.

 

After listening to these ideas, some of the female population became shy, saying they wouldn’t be able to go through with this, while others said that they would get their husbands’ permission and make up the decision. I encouraged them by saying that if they could sell wine in one corner of the village, with their husbands’ permission, why couldn’t they sell good things? The fact they are working is a good thing, so why would they say anything?

 

After this, the first lady came and signed up. Five ladies in total signed up for this training, and a few ladies ran away, afraid of earning money. A few men also joined.

 

Manu

GHNI TCD Worker

*For the purposes of wellbeing and safety, “Manvay” is a pseudonym for an indvidual being helped by this project.